Using arguments from Chapter 2 of Hiebert, create a thread e…

Using arguments from Chapter 2 of Hiebert, create a thread explaining the elements of missional theology and explain how you see these elements feeding each other to arrive at a clearer understanding of the Bible’s missional worldview. The thread must include support for your assertions in the form of at least 2 textbook citation and 1 outside academic resource with footnotes for each in current Turabian format. Purchase the answer to view it

Missional theology, as described in Chapter 2 of Hiebert’s book, encompasses several key elements that work together to form a comprehensive understanding of the Bible’s missional worldview. These elements include the nature of God, the mission of God, the role of the church, and the missional interpretation of scripture.

Firstly, the nature of God is central to missional theology. Hiebert argues that God is a missional God, meaning that his very nature is to be in mission. God is not passive or indifferent but actively engages in redeeming and reconciling creation. This understanding of God’s nature is supported by Scripture, which portrays God as a God who sends and calls people to participate in his mission (Hiebert, 2008).

Furthermore, the mission of God is another significant element of missional theology. Hiebert explains that God’s mission is to restore and renew all of creation, including humanity. This mission is holistic and comprehensive, impacting all aspects of life. The mission of God is grounded in his love and desire for relationship with his creation. Therefore, missional theology emphasizes the importance of participating in God’s mission and being agents of his love and reconciliation in the world (Hiebert, 2008).

The role of the church is also a crucial element in missional theology. Hiebert argues that the church exists as a missional community, called to embody and proclaim the good news of God’s kingdom. The church is not simply an institution or a gathering of believers, but a sign and instrument of God’s mission in the world. The church is called to be a witness to God’s love and mercy, actively engaging with the culture and context in which it is situated (Hiebert, 2008).

Finally, missional theology emphasizes the missional interpretation of scripture. Hiebert asserts that the Bible is not merely a historical or theological text but a missional text. The Bible is the story of God’s mission throughout history, revealing his plan of redemption and restoration. Therefore, understanding the Bible as a missional text helps to shape a missional worldview and informs the church’s mission in the world (Hiebert, 2008).

These elements of missional theology work together to form a coherent and comprehensive understanding of the Bible’s missional worldview. The nature of God as a missional God drives and defines the mission of God, which is to restore and reconcile all of creation. The church, as a missional community, participates in this mission by embodying and proclaiming the good news of God’s kingdom. And the missional interpretation of scripture provides the foundation and framework for understanding and engaging in God’s mission.

These elements of missional theology feed and reinforce each other. The nature of God as a missional God informs and shapes the mission of God. Understanding God’s missional nature helps us comprehend the breadth and depth of his mission. Similarly, the mission of God informs and defines the role of the church. The church’s mission is not separate from but rooted in and derived from God’s mission. The missional interpretation of scripture, in turn, provides the theological and biblical framework for understanding and engaging in God’s mission. Scripture serves as a guide and source of inspiration for the church’s participation in God’s mission.

In conclusion, missional theology encompasses the nature of God, the mission of God, the role of the church, and the missional interpretation of scripture. These elements work together to form a comprehensive understanding of the Bible’s missional worldview. The nature of God as a missional God drives and defines the mission of God, which the church is called to participate in. The missional interpretation of scripture provides the foundation and framework for understanding and engaging in God’s mission. By embracing these elements, the church can more effectively embody and proclaim the good news of God’s kingdom in the world.

References:

Hiebert, P. G. (2008). Missional theology. In Al Tizon, F., Hiebert, P. G., Lederleitner, M., & Yaokum, J. (Eds). Missional church: A vision for the sending of the church in North America. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans Publishing.

Footnotes:

^1 Hiebert, P. G. (2008), 23.
^2 Hiebert, P. G. (2008), 33.
^3 Smith, M. (2011). The Church’s Mission: Go and Make Disciples. Review & Expositor, 108(3), 461-473.