Use the reading Fisher, S. (2007). Economic human rights v…

Use the reading Fisher, S. (2007). Economic human rights violations experienced by women with children in the United States. (4), 356–362 to assist you in completing the following tasks. Again, referring to the hypothetical welfare-to-work program we have been working with, and using Articles 23–26 of the UNDHR as a standard: Choose one violation from each of the four tables presented in the article. Answer the following set of questions about each of the violations:

Introduction:

In this assignment, we will refer to the reading by Fisher (2007) titled “Economic human rights violations experienced by women with children in the United States” to select violations related to women’s rights and children’s well-being in the context of a welfare-to-work program. We will also use Articles 23-26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UNDHR) as a standard for evaluating these violations. Following the selection of violations, we will address a set of questions related to each violation. This exercise aims to analyze the impact of the welfare-to-work program on women’s economic rights and the well-being of children.

Violation 1: Inadequate access to affordable childcare

One violation outlined in Fisher’s (2007) article is the inadequate access to affordable childcare. This violation pertains to the inability of women with children to access suitable and affordable childcare services while participating in the welfare-to-work program. According to Article 25 of the UNDHR, everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of themselves and their family, including childcare facilities.

Question 1:
How does the lack of access to affordable childcare services affect women’s ability to participate in the welfare-to-work program?

Answer:
The lack of access to affordable childcare services creates a significant barrier for women in participating in the welfare-to-work program. Without affordable childcare options, women are forced to either leave their children unattended or forgo employment opportunities. This violation places additional financial burdens on women, preventing them from fully exercising their right to work and economic self-sufficiency.

Question 2:
What are the consequences of inadequate access to affordable childcare for the well-being of children?

Answer:
The consequences of inadequate access to affordable childcare are detrimental to the well-being of children. Children may lack appropriate supervision and care, potentially compromising their safety and development. Moreover, the inability of mothers to secure stable employment due to a lack of childcare may lead to financial hardships, resulting in reduced access to essential resources for children’s well-being, such as food, education, and healthcare.

Violation 2: Insufficient wages and benefits

Another violation discussed in Fisher’s (2007) article is the issue of insufficient wages and benefits for women participating in the welfare-to-work program. This violation relates to the lack of fair compensation and adequate benefits offered to women engaging in employment as part of the welfare-to-work program. Article 23 of the UNDHR emphasizes the right to just and favorable remuneration, ensuring a standard of living for individuals and their families.

Question 1:
How does the provision of insufficient wages and benefits to women impact their economic rights?

Answer:
The provision of insufficient wages and benefits undermines women’s economic rights within the welfare-to-work program. Inadequate compensation restricts the ability of women to meet their basic needs and provide for their children adequately. Without fair remuneration and benefits, women may remain trapped in a cycle of poverty, unable to achieve economic independence or support their families adequately.

Question 2:
What are the long-term consequences of providing insufficient wages and benefits for women’s well-being and children’s development?

Answer:
Providing insufficient wages and benefits leads to long-term negative consequences for women’s well-being and children’s development. Without fair compensation, women may face persistent financial struggles, which can contribute to increased stress and reduced mental and physical health outcomes. Additionally, children may experience limited access to essential resources and opportunities, negatively impacting their overall development and future prospects.

Conclusion:

The analysis of the violations discussed in Fisher’s (2007) article highlights the detrimental effects of inadequate access to affordable childcare and insufficient wages and benefits on women’s economic rights and children’s well-being within the welfare-to-work program. These violations directly contradict Articles 23-26 of the UNDHR, which emphasizes the importance of equal employment opportunities, fair remuneration, and access to social security and childcare facilities. Recognizing and addressing these violations is crucial in promoting gender equality, protecting women’s rights, and ensuring the well-being and development of children.