NEED THE FOLLOWING ANSWERED IN 150 WORDS MINIMUM AND REFEREN…

NEED THE FOLLOWING ANSWERED IN 150 WORDS MINIMUM AND REFERENCES CITED IN APA FORMAT IF USED. 1.  From the perspective of positive psychology, what are the two major limitations in national statistics that answer the question, “How are we doing?” 2.  What three components define SWB? 3.  Define and give an example of the peak-end rule. 4.  How are the hedonic and eudaimonic conceptions complementary and interrelated? 5.  How do the hedonic and eudaimonic views of happiness differ as to their definitions and causes of happiness?

From the perspective of positive psychology, there are two major limitations in national statistics that answer the question “How are we doing?”. The first limitation is the focus on measuring negative aspects of well-being, such as rates of crime, poverty, and illness. While these indicators provide valuable information about societal problems, they do not capture the full spectrum of well-being. Positive psychology emphasizes the importance of studying positive aspects of human experience, such as happiness, flourishing, and life satisfaction.

The second limitation is the reliance on subjective well-being (SWB) as the primary measure of how well we are doing. SWB is composed of three components: life satisfaction, positive affect, and negative affect. Life satisfaction refers to an individual’s overall evaluation of their life, while positive affect measures the frequency and intensity of positive emotions experienced, and negative affect measures the frequency and intensity of negative emotions experienced.

The peak-end rule is a cognitive bias that states that people’s memory of an experience is largely influenced by the peak (the most intense point) and the end of that experience. For example, if someone takes a vacation and encounters a few negative experiences throughout but the trip ends on a positive note, their overall memory of the vacation is likely to be positive. This is because they remember the pleasantness of the end and perhaps the peak moments more vividly than the negative experiences.

The hedonic and eudaimonic conceptions of happiness are complementary and interrelated. The hedonic view focuses on the pursuit of pleasure and the absence of pain as the ultimate goal of happiness. It emphasizes subjective well-being and the experience of positive emotions. On the other hand, the eudaimonic view defines happiness as the pursuit of a meaningful life, personal growth, and the realization of one’s potential. It emphasizes psychological well-being and the experience of purpose and fulfillment.

While the hedonic and eudaimonic views of happiness differ in their definitions and causes, they are not mutually exclusive. In fact, they are considered to be interrelated and complementary perspectives. Research suggests that individuals who lead a eudaimonic life, characterized by a sense of meaning and purpose, are more likely to experience higher levels of subjective well-being. Likewise, individuals who have higher levels of subjective well-being are more likely to engage in activities that contribute to personal growth and development, which aligns with the eudaimonic view.

The hedonic view defines happiness in terms of pleasure, satisfaction, and positive emotions. It focuses on the immediate and subjective experience of feeling good. In contrast, the eudaimonic view defines happiness in terms of living a life of virtue, personal growth, and self-actualization. It emphasizes the pursuit of meaning and purpose, even if it requires enduring temporary negative experiences. The hedonic view sees happiness as a state of mind that can be achieved through maximizing pleasure and minimizing pain, while the eudaimonic view sees happiness as a state of being that emerges from living a life of purpose and virtue.

In summary, positive psychology highlights the limitations in national statistics that focus on negative aspects of well-being and the reliance on subjective well-being as the primary measure of how well we are doing. It also emphasizes the complementary nature of hedonic and eudaimonic conceptions of happiness, recognizing the importance of both subjective well-being and the pursuit of a meaningful life.