Based on your learning in Hooley, Butcher, Nock and Mineka (…

Based on your learning in Hooley, Butcher, Nock and Mineka (2017) this week, 1. First, discuss the differences between paraphilias and sexual dysfunctions, and provide at least two examples of each. Second, should a sexual dysfunction be considered a mental disorder based on your learning this week? REFERENCE: Butcher, J. N., Mineka, S., & Hooley, J. M., & Nock M.K (2017). Abnormal psychology (17th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Purchase the answer to view it

In the field of abnormal psychology, there are various conditions that fall under the umbrella of sexual disorders. Two of these conditions are paraphilias and sexual dysfunctions. The primary difference between paraphilias and sexual dysfunctions lies in the nature of the problem.

Paraphilias are characterized by atypical and recurrent sexual fantasies, urges, or behaviors that involve non-human objects, suffering or humiliation of oneself or others, or non-consenting individuals. These fantasies or behaviors must persist for at least six months and cause significant distress or impairment in functioning. Examples of paraphilias include pedophilia, fetishism, and exhibitionism.

On the other hand, sexual dysfunctions refer to persistent or recurrent difficulties in achieving or maintaining sexual satisfaction. These difficulties can manifest as problems with desire, arousal, orgasm, or pain during sexual activity. Unlike paraphilias, sexual dysfunctions are not inherently related to deviant sexual fantasies or behaviors. Examples of sexual dysfunctions include erectile dysfunction, female orgasmic disorder, and genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder.

The distinction between paraphilias and sexual dysfunctions is important because it helps clinicians understand the underlying nature of the problem. Paraphilias involve unconventional and often socially unacceptable sexual behaviors or fantasies, whereas sexual dysfunctions reflect difficulties in experiencing normal sexual functioning.

Now, let us consider whether sexual dysfunctions should be considered mental disorders. The categorization of sexual dysfunctions as mental disorders has been a topic of debate among experts in the field. Some argue that sexual dysfunctions should be seen as medical conditions rather than psychopathologies. They argue that the experience of sexual dysfunction is primarily a biological issue, involving physiological and hormonal factors, and should therefore be addressed by medical professionals.

However, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), sexual dysfunctions are classified as mental disorders. The DSM-5 is the authoritative guide used by mental health professionals for the diagnosis of psychiatric conditions. The inclusion of sexual dysfunctions in the DSM-5 reflects the understanding that these conditions can cause significant distress and impairment in individual’s lives.

Importantly, the classification of sexual dysfunctions as mental disorders does not imply that individuals with these conditions are inherently “abnormal” or “crazy.” Rather, it serves as a diagnostic framework that allows clinicians to accurately identify and address the difficulties individuals may be facing in their sexual lives.

By classifying sexual dysfunctions as mental disorders, it provides a framework for clinicians to evaluate, diagnose, and treat individuals who are experiencing difficulties in their sexual functioning. It also enables individuals to seek reimbursement for therapy or medical interventions related to sexual dysfunctions. Thus, the classification of sexual dysfunctions as mental disorders has practical benefits in terms of access to healthcare resources and treatments.

In conclusion, paraphilias are characterized by atypical sexual fantasies or behaviors, whereas sexual dysfunctions involve difficulties in achieving or maintaining sexual satisfaction. Examples of paraphilias include pedophilia and fetishism, while examples of sexual dysfunctions include erectile dysfunction and genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder. Sexual dysfunctions are classified as mental disorders in the DSM-5, allowing for accurate diagnosis and treatment. This classification provides benefits in terms of access to healthcare resources and reimbursement for interventions related to sexual dysfunctions. However, it is important to note that the classification as a mental disorder does not imply that individuals with sexual dysfunctions are abnormal or crazy, but rather acknowledges the distress and impairment they may experience.