1. Identify the level of measurement used in this study…

1. Identify the level of measurement used in this study. 2. Create a Frequency Table with 6 classes. 3. Create a Histogram based on the Frequency table in problem 2. 4. Find the mean, median, and mode of the number of chocolate bars consumed by 16-year-old girls in a month. 5. Find the Variance and Standard Deviation of the number of chocolate bars consumed by 16-year-old girls in a month.

1. The level of measurement used in this study is not mentioned in the given information. However, based on the context of the problem, it can be presumed that the variable being measured, i.e., the number of chocolate bars consumed by 16-year-old girls in a month, is likely to be measured using the interval or ratio level of measurement. This is because the number of chocolate bars consumed is a quantitative variable that can be counted and expressed in numerical terms.

2. To create a Frequency Table with 6 classes for the number of chocolate bars consumed by 16-year-old girls in a month, we first need to have the raw data values. Unfortunately, the problem does not provide this information. Without the raw data, it is not possible to create a specific frequency table.

However, I can provide an example of how a frequency table with 6 classes could look based on hypothetical data. Let’s assume we have the following data for the number of chocolate bars consumed by 16-year-old girls in a month: 4, 6, 3, 8, 5, 3, 5, 7, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 4, 2, 5.

We can then create a frequency table as follows:

| Class | Frequency |
|:————-:|:———:|
| 1-2 | 2 |
| 3-4 | 4 |
| 5-6 | 5 |
| 7-8 | 2 |
| 9-10 | 1 |
| 11-12 | 0 |

In the frequency table above, the class represents the range of values, and the frequency indicates how many observations fall within that range. Please note that the class intervals have been created based on the available data and can be adjusted according to the specific data set.

3. To create a histogram based on the frequency table provided in problem 2, we plot the class intervals on the x-axis and the corresponding frequencies on the y-axis. The columns or bars of the histogram represent the frequencies for each class interval.

Since we do not have a specific frequency table for this particular problem, it is not possible to create a histogram. However, I can explain the general procedure for creating one.

Once we have the frequency table, we can plot the histogram by drawing bars whose heights represent the frequencies of each class interval. The bars are typically drawn adjacent to each other, as the horizontal axis represents a continuous variable.

4. To find the mean, median, and mode of the number of chocolate bars consumed by 16-year-old girls in a month, we need the raw data values. Unfortunately, the problem does not provide this information. Without the actual data, it is not possible to calculate the mean, median, and mode accurately.

The mean is calculated by summing up all the values and dividing by the total number of observations. The median is the middle value when the data is arranged in order. The mode is the value that appears most frequently in the data set.

5. To find the variance and standard deviation of the number of chocolate bars consumed by 16-year-old girls in a month, we need the raw data values. Unfortunately, the problem does not provide this information. Without the actual data, it is not possible to calculate the variance and standard deviation accurately.

The variance is a measure of how spread out the data is from the mean. It is calculated by finding the average of the squared differences between each data point and the mean. The standard deviation is the square root of the variance and represents the average amount by which each data point differs from the mean.